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Information > Teudogar_FAQ3
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Teudogar Development FAQ
Development, Future Teudogar Games, Business
by Wolf Mittag

ABOUT THIS FAQ
About this FAQ
Teudogar Game FAQ
Teudogar Concept/History FAQ
Teudogar Development FAQ
What's in all these German passages?
Ich verstehe kein Englisch! Was mache ich mit diesem FAQ?

DEVELOPMENT
What system did you use to make this game?
What programming language did you use for the Teudogar engine?
What was the most code-intensive part of the engine?
What was the most difficult part of engine?
Why don't you release the source code (for free)?
How did you create the game world?
How did you make the different graphics tile combinations look right?
How did you do that river water animation?
Did you steal any graphics from Ultima?
Was it a lot of work to create all these graphics tiles?
Why do most tile-based indie 2d games look so bad?
I wonder what you would be able to do with a larger team and a nice budget?
What is it about Demo and Full Version size?
Is it worthwhile to write a historical RPG?
Is it more work to write a historical RPG than a fantasy one?
Womit haben Sie die Spielwelt erstellt?
Wo und wie kann ich Programmieren lernen?

BUSINESS
Can one get rich by writing shareware computer games?
Are you grateful when people buy your software?
Why isn't the Full Version cheaper?
What do you think about piracy?
Why do I have to register before I can post to the forum?
Warum ist Teudogar nicht noch billiger?
Warum sind Computerspiele nicht grundsätzlich kostenlos?
Fällt es vielen Menschen schwer, nicht-körperliche Arbeit als Arbeit anzuerkennen?

PLANNED FUTURE TEUDOGAR GAMES
Will you turn Teudogar into a trilogy?
What might happen in Teudogar II - Roman Rule?
Would Teudogar II be easier or more difficult to write than part I?
Teudogar II ought to have a vast game world!
What might happen in "Teudogar III - Uprising against Rome"?



Teudogar Development FAQ
Development, Future Teudogar Games, Business
by Wolf Mittag


ABOUT THIS FAQ


About this FAQ

This is a somewhat edited compilation of email replies and forum postings regarding Teudogar that I've written over the years.

Apart from the main English text, there are a few German postings appended to most chapters, which usually deal with the same questions already answered in English before.

If you still have any questions you couldn't find answers to in this FAQ, you are welcome to contact us: wolfmittag.com/contact.

Best regards,
Wolf Mittag (author of Teudogar)

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Teudogar Game FAQ

Contents: Gameplay, Combat, Equipment, Character System, Spell Casting, Plot, Cheat Mode, Technical, Ordering.

Huge wealth of practical information about the Teudogar game.

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Teudogar Concept/History FAQ

Contents: Game Concept, Historical Facts.

Why Teudogar has been designed the way it is. Plus explanations of the historical background of many game aspects.

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Teudogar Development FAQ

Contents: Development, Future Teudogar Games, Business.

How Teudogar was developed: Information on programming, graphics, and game world creation. Planned Teudogar II + III games. Plus some reflections on business aspects.

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What's in all these German passages?

Usually, the same questions have already been answered in English before.

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Ich verstehe kein Englisch! Was mache ich mit diesem FAQ?

Es tut mir leid, daß es bisher noch keine deutsche Version gibt. Wie Sie sehen, ist es ziemlich viel Text, und der Übersetzungs-Aufwand wäre erheblich.

Eine Notlösung wäre vielleicht folgendes: Sie könnten die Passagen, die Sie besonders interessieren, markieren und kopieren (Strg+C), und dann zu Babelfish http://babelfish.altavista.com gehen und dort einfügen (Strg+V). Die davon erstellten automatischen Übersetzungen sind zwar nicht sehr gut, aber meistens doch hinreichend verständlich.

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DEVELOPMENT


What system did you use to make this game?

I wrote my own, independent engine (in some parts based on code from an old MSDOS RPG I'd written some years earlier), but writing most modules completely new from scratch (using C++).

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What programming language did you use for the Teudogar engine?

I wrote the Teudogar Engine in C++: about 140,000 lines or 2,400 pages of C++ code; printed on endless paper, that'd result in a 650 yards / 600 meter paper trail. With that language (and a clean, disciplined programming style), I found it sufficiently easy to keep control of all this code, to keep it work interdependently, and to keep the entire project reasonably bug-free (in spite of this project's size, the final 1.00 release contained only three or four very minor bugs).

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What was the most code-intensive part of the engine?

The NPC system (including artificial intelligence, daily schedules, finding their way around, behaviors in different situations, NPCs interacting with gameworld, etc) (750k .CPP file). #2 in terms of size is the game world editor (including game world generator) with about 700k, #3 the main loop and the player's interaction with game world (650k), and #4 user interface (600k). Most other modules (.CPP files) such as dialogs, output, basic technical functions, combat etc are each below 250k in size.

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What was the most difficult part of engine?

Data organization for the game world (especially arranging ground and object tile data in such a way that you can move smoothly from one game world chunk to another without even noticing), and getting NPCs to recognize and understand their surroundings and find their way around the game world. Getting the basic conception for these two systems right took some real effort; however, once they were in place, everything else was more or less organic growth, i.e. adding layer by layer of game world sub-systems / rules for all possible gaming situations / rules for all sorts of challenges an NPC might face and so on.

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Why don't you release the source code (for free)?

By now, the entire C++ source code for DARGHUL is about 175,000 lines (without counting files that are obsolete / no longer in use). If one were to print that out, one would get a paper trail of about 700 meters (about 2,300 feet, or almost 1/2 mile).

I inherited about 2/3 of that from Teudogar, and I recycled a lot of the more generic stuff from older/other projects. Nonetheless, writing and putting it all together has been an enormous amount of work, and since I'm an independent developer, no one paid me a salary for this. Consequently I intend to keep the source code proprietary, and try to re-use it as a basis for as many games as possible, in order to earn at least part of my invested work back via full version sales.

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How did you create the game world?

There's an in-house Developer's Version of Teudogar with a game world generator and editor. To create a location, you'd first paint a detailed map, much like what you later see in the automap screen, only with different, specific colors for everything, e.g. different shades of gray for wall type A/B/C/etc, different shades of green for forest type A/B/C/etc, and again different colors for floor type A/B/C/etc, earth, grass, swamp, and so on. You'd also draw in markers defining the outlines for the roofs of the houses, markers for doors, beds, columns, cattle stalls etc, as well as special markers for rivers and brooks.

Then you'd run this graphical map through the generator, and thoroughly check (walk around) the resulting basic game world: Does it feel right in natura - e.g., are distances between houses and the size of the houses right? Suffiencent space for all NPCs you later want to live there? Does the resulting settlement as a whole feel natural? and so on. Usually, you'd return to the painting program dozens of time, move some houses, correct some roads, resize other things etc, then re-generate and re-test the whole thing, until you feel it's really perfect.

Next step, you'd define the NPC types you want to be available in this location, and place all NPCs in their respective houses and define their daily schedules: When creating a NPC, you're automatically asked where you want him/her to work/spend his leasure/eat/sleep etc, and define this by simply walking him there. You'd then set a dialog and select a portrait for this NPC, as well as make some other settings (specific character type - farmer, warrior, nobleman? hostile towards player? surrender or fight til death? and so on) within the NPC edit screen. Finally you'd assign property within the house information tables and assign someone to look after the cattle.

Now the real work begins - manually furnishing the game world; placing and filling boxes and chests (and defining production), fireplaces, ash and dirt and rubbish, cooking gear, farming equipment, tools for craftsmen, and thousands of other things. This takes days, not just hours (depending, of course, on the size of the settlement). Then you'd have to test-play everything, and when that's done, some final graphical touches, to make the settlement look really inhabited - more garbage, carelessly dropped personal items, broken pottery and so on.

(I've been considering releasing the game world editor, but as you can see from this brief description, that'd require writing a good deal of documentation, as well as adding hundreds of additional checks and data verifications, more convenient menues, some translations etc - i.e., a lot of work, and I think, apart from some basic curiosity (how do you create the game world?), few people would have real interest (i.e. be willing to buy it), so it probably wouldn't be worth the effort, at least from a material point of view.)

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How did you make the different graphics tile combinations look right?

At first, the game world generator places one single type of graphics tile (e.g. grass, or earth, or a wall) for every respective tile-type-color it finds in the original rough sketch map. Then, in a second generating step, this basic tile is automatically changed to one of a dozen or more alternative tiles for that ground type (depending on neighboring tiles, and with different frequency percentages for each specific tile number).

Teudogar uses about 1,500 different ground tiles, and about 3,000 object tiles. (DARGHUL: >2,000 ground and >4,000 object tiles.) That includes about 100 different tiles for earth ground (floor of the houses, paths and roads), and several hundred different grass tiles, some of these for transition between different ground types, and most just for variation within a type.

As a rule of thumb, within a radius of about 6x6 tiles, the same tile oughtn't be visible more than once; otherwise one would see repeated graphical patterns, and the resulting game world landscape wouldn't look natural. To avoid this, there are usually at least 2 or 3 different versions of every tile, some created by simply flipping/rotating the original, some with an entirely different graphical structure.

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How did you do that river water animation?

That's a 12 phase animation, with each phase being only slightly different in relation to its predecessor, and, of course, there are several hundred different tiles in order to reflect all possible directions, and a couple of variations for each of these. It has been pretty difficult to reach that natural look.

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Did you steal any graphics from Ultima?

Origin Software invented this sort of twisted bird's-eye-perspective for their Ultima games series. Insofar as Teudogar follows the same approach, there's certainly a similarity. And yes, both games use inventory windows that can be moved freely.

But as soon as you compare details (e.g. http://www.teudogar.com/teud-u7.jpg), you'll realize that that's where the similarities end: Shapes, outlines, textures and pixel patterns are alltogether different. There's definitely been no theft, and, to the best of my knowledge, not even "borrowing".

Teudogar's graphics have been created independently from scratch by a German graphics artist, Arne Niemuth, who's been paid pretty well for his work, and yes, I do possess all legal rights and title to them.

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Was it a lot of work to create all these graphics tiles?

It's definitively been a heavy load of work - about 3,000 objects and 2,000 different ground tiles, and more than 70 sets of NPCs and equipment (each consisting of 64 animation phases), plus inventory, paperdoll, user interface and so on. I've witnessed Arne Niemuth painting thousands of graphics tiles, modifying them on my request, re-modifying them yet again, adding improvements, experimenting with different versions etc, until we both felt they looked just exactly right - and all of this in literally thousands of cases.

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Why do most tile-based indie 2d games look so bad?

In many cases, their walls, grass, trees etc graphic tiles look good enough if taken for themselves. However, what many games seem to lack are a couple of hundreds of extra variation tiles, i.e., they too frequently place the very same, unvaried graphics tile next to each other several times in a row, instead of using different, variated versions for each occurrence (like Teudogar does).

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I wonder what you would be able to do with a larger team and a nice budget?

Maybe less, since worries about earning back all that money that we'd spend would influence our game design. Most expensive in terms of production time is the complexity and game depth; this relates mostly to programming and dialogs, but also affects game world and graphics. So if I was working for my shareholders in a listed company, the first measures I'd take would be A) to buy shiny graphics, and B) to drastically simplify everything - reduce game depth and complexity, reduce interactivity, reduce number of choices, cut down on alternatives, and so on. While that might reduce gaming fun, it probably wouldn't affect sales numbers, since these would depend more on favorable press reporting, enticing screenshots, and favorable physical placement in stores...

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What is it about Demo and Full Version size?

Many beginning developers make the mistake of thinking that people will pay for the entire game (full plus demo version), since that entire game will often have about the same size as commercial games that don't offer a demo. Of course this thinking is flawed.

Since the customer already has the demo, he or she will only pay for the DIFFERENCE between demo and full version, and will not care at all about how large or good the demo has been. The demo is already consumed; it can't be sold anymore.

Of course this will force you to make your game bigger than a commercial game that goes without a demo; but, again, that's life. Best solution is probably to keep as much game out of the demo as possible; reserve all goodies for the full version. (Teudogar's demo is probably already too large.)

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Is it worthwhile to write a historical RPG?

Writing a historical RPG is a challenge, and it's definitely much more work than writing a fantasy game, where you can always tweak game world and plot according to your design needs. Since fantasy games seem to be more popular than historically accurate games, it isn't very economical either.

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Is it more work to write a historical RPG than a fantasy one?

In Teudogar, almost everything you see or hear about is truly corresponding to historical facts: That level of authenticity requires about 10 to 20 times as much work as a fantasy game, where I can tweak game world and plot according to my technical needs, where I needn't research any facts or put in extra work to make plot, characters and game world locations realistic/authentic/plausible.

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Womit haben Sie die Spielwelt erstellt?

Teudogar verwendet eine eigene, von mir selbst programmierte Engine: D.h., ich habe dafür kein fertiges Spielsystem lizensiert und verwendet, sondern sowohl das eigentliche Spiel als auch den Spielwelt-Editor selbst entwickelt und programmiert.

Bei diesem Spielwelt-Editor handelt es sich um eine variierte Version des Spiels, in der man außer den üblichen Anseh- und Objekt-Bewegen-Funktionen eben auch Bodenkacheln und Objekte neu hinzufügen und ablegen kann, plus noch einige Generator-Funktionen.

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Wo und wie kann ich Programmieren lernen?

Mir persönlich hat "C - the Complete Reference" von Herbert Schildt, McGrawHill, 1987, ca 750 Seiten, den "Durchbruch" gebracht. Dieses Buch ist m.M. konkret, anschaulich, übersichtlich, guter Aufbau, verständliche Beispielprogramme; rundum empfehlenswert, sowohl zum Lernen als auch als Nachschlagewerk. (Einzige Einschränkung ist freilich, daß es nur C behandelt und nicht die C++ Techniken, und daß es alt ist, also keine Windows-Programmierung behandelt, sondern sich wirklich nur mit dem reinen C (der eigentlichen Sprache) befaßt.)

Als Einführung in C++ hatte ich "The C++ Programming Language' von Bjarne Stroustrup verwendet (setzt Beherrschung von C voraus). Das fand ich ganz gut, aber nicht großartig, und außerdem etwas mühsam zu lesen.

Zu diesen Themen, ebenso wie zur Windows- und DirectX-Programmierung, gibt es aber auch eine Vielzahl von Einführungstexten und Artikeln und downloadbaren Kursen im Internet.

Ich würde daher empfehlen, einige solche Kurse zu lesen, vielleicht irgendwo noch einen zusammenfassenden Referenz-Text zum Nachschlagen downzuloaden, und ansonsten so viel Quelltext wie möglich zu lesen - gerade das ist m.M. nach überhaupt das Allerbeste, was man zum Lernen tun kann.

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BUSINESS


Can one get rich by writing shareware computer games?

Writing shareware is a bit like the music industry - a handful of top names who manage to reach a great sales volume make money, sometimes a lot of it, but the majority of developers can consider themselves successful if their sales actually cover their costs.

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Are you grateful when people buy your software?

I am. (After all, you could simply keep your money and watch TV instead, or download and play yet another Free Demo Version of some other game.)

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Why isn't the Full Version cheaper?

Finding an acceptable price is quite a balancing act. The problem is, although lots of people enjoy computer games, there are so many free alternatives that pretty few people are willing to pay any money at all for any game, regardless of whether it costs $4.95, $14.95, or $24.95.

In the experience of most authors, the number of people buying full versions does not go up when prices are lower: It seems as if those few people who are willing to pay are willing to do so even if the price is comparativly high, while most of those who don't want to pay won't do so even if the price is drastically lower (which is their good right, of course).

But since developing software does cost a lot of time and money, and these development costs need to be recouped via sales of that software, and since, regardless of the price, comparatively few people will buy a full version, the price simply cannot be $2.99.

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What do you think about piracy?

Naturally, I feel intense hate for people who steal my software. But I think I can understand their motivation and way of thinking. I realize that many people find it difficult to pay for software or music, because these are copy-able goods: One additional person getting a copy will not deprive anyone else of his or hers. Even the producer doesn't lose anything concrete (except for an opportunity to sell his product).

But while individual acts of piracy won't do much harm by themselves, they can do enormous harm collectively, because they undermine software developers' ability to earn back the development costs that went into producing the software.

Most pirates would reply, "That may well be so; still, it'll be all right if I get it for free, because surely SOMEONE ELSE will pay for the software." Problem with human behavior is, when there's a chance to avoid costs, virtually everyone will take it; so there usually will not be someone else, or, at best, only very few of them.

And every one of these few will have to pay a higher price, because the entire development costs need to be paid by them alone, instead of being fairly spread over _all_ users of the software.

Since it's impossible to do much about piracy, I think my main responsibility as a developer is to focus on my paying customers: These great people are the ones I owe everything to; and my job is to do my utmost to satisfy them.

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Why do I have to register before I can post to the forum?

The forum has been flooded by spambots, with dozens of new spam threads posted every single day (commercials for pills, porn, mp3s, whatever). Obviously, manually removing spam is far less efficient than automatically posting it, so my removing these threads once or twice a week simply couldn't keep pace with their posting of more and more new loads of spam. At some point, one would have had to browse through hundreds of spam messages in order to finally find a real, topic-related posting. I think this destroys the usefulness of a forum. So there was no choice but to remove guest posting. Registering is very simple, though, and of course it's free.

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Warum ist Teudogar nicht noch billiger?

Die Entscheidung für einen Preis ist ein Balance-Akt. Denn es haben zwar viele Menschen Freude an Computerspielen. Aber es gibt soviele kostenlose Alternativen (z.B. kostenlose Demos anderer Spiele, oder einfach Fernsehen), daß nur wenige Leute bereit sind, für ein Computerspiel Geld auszugeben, egal ob es 5, 15, oder 25 EUR kostet.

Die meisten Autoren haben die Erfahrung gemacht, daß niedrigere Preise nicht zu mehr Verkäufen führen. Es scheint so, also ob diejenigen Leute, die zum Zahlen bereit sind, auch einen vergleichweise hohen Preis akzeptieren, während die Zahlungs-Unwilligen so oder so nicht zahlen wollen, selbst wenn der Preis deutlich niedriger wäre. Das ist natürlich auch ihr gutes Recht.

Aber da die Entwicklung von Software sehr viel Arbeit und Geld kostet, und diese Entwicklungskosten durch Verkäufe der Software wieder hereingeholt werden müssen, und da, unabhängig vom Preis, nur eine begrenzte Zahl von Leuten eine Vollversion kaufen wird, kann der Preis halt nicht 2,99 EUR sein.

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Warum sind Computerspiele nicht grundsätzlich kostenlos?

Weil die Entwicklung von Computerspielen enormen Arbeitsaufwand (Programmierung, Texteschreiben, Spielwelt-Erstellen uvm) und erhebliche Kosten (Graphik, Software, Webhosting uvm) erfordert, und all das auf irgendeine Weise finanziert werden muß.

(Das ist übrigens im Prinzip mit allen Dingen so. Sie würden ja z.B. auch nicht erwarten, daß Ihnen ein Bäcker kostenlos Brot bäckt, und dabei auch noch das Mehl auf seine eigenen Kosten für Sie kauft. Oder ein Bauarbeiter Ihnen umsonst ein Haus baut, und dabei auch noch alles Baumaterial für Sie bezahlt. Da niemand ohne Einkommen überleben kann, ist so etwas unmöglich.)

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Fällt es vielen Menschen schwer, nicht-körperliche Arbeit als Arbeit anzuerkennen?

Ich würde sagen, ja. Daß Mauern oder Graben Arbeit ist, kann so ziemlich jeder verstehen. Daß Programmieren, Schreiben, Graphik-Erstellung, oder Beratung ebenfalls Arbeit ist, scheint aber vielen Menschen nur schwer verständlich zu sein - jedenfalls gibt es überraschend viele Menschen, die überzeugt sind, daß es nicht richtig ist, für diese Art von Arbeiten Geld zu verlangen, und daß man diese Art von Arbeiten eigentlich umsonst für sie tun sollte.

Bei Computerspielen (und vermutlich auch Musik und Prostitution) kommt erschwerend hinzu, daß viele Kunden meinen, daß die Sache doch soviel Spaß macht, daß es eigentlich unfair ist, dafür Geld zu verlangen. Der Denkfehler liegt dabei natürlich darin, daß das, was dem Kunden Spaß macht, für den Anbieter der Dienstleistung Arbeit ist, weil auch etwas Unterhaltsames nur noch begrenzt unterhaltsam ist, wenn man es jeden Tag mehrere Stunden lang als berufliche Tätigkeit ausübt.

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PLANNED FUTURE TEUDOGAR GAMES


Will you turn Teudogar into a trilogy?

I think this is a natural choice. In my opinion, there were 3 distinct phases, i.e. I - Alliance with Rome (start of the invasion, 12 B.C.), II - Roman Rule (somewhere between 8 B.C. and 6 A.D.; this includes some minor failed uprisings by several tribes but would mostly be about Rome's consolidation of power over the conquered area, and the natives' adaptation to the changed way of life), III - Rebellion against Rome (governor Varus' arrival and death, and the final breakdown of Roman rule; this would include the apparent calm in the years immediately before the uprising; 7 A.D. to 9 A.D.).

Portioning these events over 3 games would enable my to fast-forwand and skip actionless periods. So you might for example play episode 2 as a young man, excited about the changes, possibly loyal to Rome, and definitely aware of the numerous improvements in cultural and living standards immediately following the occupation; while in part 3 you might be a decade older, wiser, and disillusioned, aware that the material improvements were paid for far too dearly with all the freedoms you gave up. Part 2 might thematize your enthusiasm (which would be well-founded, given the contrast to how Germania was before the invasion), and part 3 your disillusionment, realizing of the drawbacks, and, finally, opposition to what you once fought for.

Part 2 could be full of promises and hope, while part 3 would be about looking back and comparing past hopes with present outcomes - i.e., broken dreams, realization of how unsatisfactory the consequences of your past actions really are, and how your initial pride about having forced change and progress on your people changes into shame about having helped to enslave them, culminating in your decision to undo the damage you had done, and to actively fight your former Roman allies. (Of course this would only be one option; continuous loyality or neutrality and so on would be others, all of course depending on what you did in part 2.)

What I'd like to do would be to make sure that the situation at the start of Part 3 would be determined by your actions in Part 2 (possibly via an import-save-game function), i.e. your job and position, wife, status, wealth, loyalities, friends, your village's situation and so on, thus providing continuity of plot and character. I.e., most of the advantages of a 15-year-series of events (continuous immersion, and experiencing the outcomes of your actions), without the drawbacks (all boring phases / too much time to kill with nonessential actions).

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What might happen in Teudogar II - Roman Rule?

The Roman occupation of Germania was definitely an exciting time, chaotic and violent, oppressive and bureaucratic, but also absolutely dynamic, with centuries-old traditions being overthrown within months or weeks, with people realizing and grasping new, unheard-of opportunities, and with unprecedented growth and prosperity coming to parts of Germania. Change everywhere; winners and losers; some people losing everything they had, others lifted to positions they could never have dreamt of; and really everyone's life being disrupted, and changed, for better or worse.

"Teudogar I" was basically the quiet before the storm - a static world, although with everyone aware they were facing change in the near future. "Teudogar II - Roman Rule" would be where you actually experience, live through, and possibly shape this change, facing lots of cultural conflicts, being confronted with Roman administration, taxes and injustices, observing or aiding people's different ways of and success with adapting to the new way life, and so on

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Would Teudogar II be easier or more difficult to write than part I?

One convenient thing about writing Teudogar II - Roman Rule would be that there'd be such a huge amount of timeless occupation stories, anecdotes and subplots to choose from (like Germany 1945, Iraq 2003, Afghanistan 2002, and so on); basically lots of things are really timeless and repeat over and over, whether it's Alexander's or Augustus' or Stalin's or Bush's armies.

Teudogar I was much more difficult in regard to sources / anecdotes, since almost everywhere where a cilizatory inferior, illiterate country has been invaded, almost all reports we get are purely from the invaders' point of view. In contrast, occupations have very frequently been endured by people able to report about their experience, so there'd be a wealth of inspirational sources.

And of course Roman provinicial life is pretty well documentated by itself. Writing a plot playing in this period I'd have lots of historical accounts, literature, primary sources and so on available, much much more than there ever was about the pre-invasion Teutons.

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Teudogar II ought to have a vast game world!

Well, there were around 50 Roman Camps along the Rhine, plus the Roman city of Cologe. And in Germania proper there probably were several major Roman administration and trading cities (like recently discovered Waldgirmes), plus many dozens of minor (and some major) Roman army camps in almost every strategic location (tribal borders, rivers, major roads etc). And of course the Teutons themselves, several dozen tribes with hundreds of villages and thousands of single farmsteads.

It's a pretty large area with an awful lot of settlements, and a population of several million. Even if I were to drastically reduce and simplify everything, there would still remain an awful lot of houses and people. And every single house would have to be furnished, and every single person should have at least something to say (otherwise the whole endeavor would be pointless).

Apart from whether it'd be feasible at all, I'm not sure it'd really be such a good thing in terms of gameplay. My impression is that life in ancient Germania was pretty uniform. If you know one village, you basically know every village. After the 3rd or 4th it'd get repetitive. Insofar I'm wondering if it mightn't perhaps be both the easiest and the best approach to simply feature no more than just a representative selection of locations:

That'd of course include standard Germanic villages and farmsteads, plus a major Roman administrative/trading city within Germania, some minor Roman outposts, and, most interestingly, the large Roman city of Cologne (oppidum Ubiorum).

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What might happen in "Teudogar III - Uprising against Rome"?

Teudogar is kind of set up for a trilogy - 1 = Alliance with Rome, 2 = Roman Rule, 3 = Uprising against Rome. This 3rd part could follow regardless of whether you've concluded an alliance with the Romans, since - no matter if defeated or allied - the Romans would treat your tribe the same way colonial rulers everywhere and over all ages have treated barbarians under their rule.

Liberating a Teutonic town would definitely be part of that. Boy-meets-girl-plot plus you later have children have also been requested by several gamers, and might be fun to write. Taking Romans prisoner might also be interesting. In reality, Teutons who did this crucified their victims, or cut their throats to tell the future from the streaming blood, or cut out their tongues (this was especially done to Roman lawyers). These examples might tell you what an intense hate many Teutons felt against the Romans by the time there finally was a Teutonic rebellion. It would be the job of Teudogar 2 to give reasons for this hate, which would result in the uprising in Teudogar 3.

This uprising may have elements of both the historical Arminius guerrilla war as well as the historical Batavian rebellion. I love the anarchic, wild, anything-goes atmosphere of that time, with numerous Roman commanders declaring themselves emperor; cowardly, mutinous Roman troops; the sleazy Roman city of Cologne; barbarians plotting great conquests only to fail with even small tactical attacks; Teutonic seers directing war operations; and so on; this was a very colorful period. During that uprising, Teutons managed to capture the ship of the Roman general in a nightly raid (however, since he spent the night with a famous whore in the city of Cologne, he was absent); anyway the Teutons navigated this large ship over numerous smaller riverways all the way from the Rhine to far inland Germania, to the seer Veleda's tower, where they gave it as a gift to her, in acknowledgement of her so far eerily accurate prophecies. (Imagine Sierra-Leonian rebels capturing a U.S. destroyer (whose commander is on shore with a Sierra-Leonian whore at that time), and giving this huge ship as a gift to a Sierra-Leonian witch-doctoress.) Of course since Teudogar 3 would play once again in the Cheruscan and Chattan tribal areas, there wouldn't be Cologne but smaller Roman-founded cities; and during the late Augustian age, Roman discipline was probably still somewhat better than after Nero's death. But elements of the following chaos and insubordination would already have been in place.

As to the size of your force, Roman governor Varus marched through Germania with about 20,000 men; so similar to Teudogar 1, part of Teudogar 3 would have to be about yet again forming an alliance, and setting up a secret guerrilla army with sufficient strength to do real damage to the Romans. However that'd only be part of the game. I'd provide for far more direct, hands-on action in all future Teudogar games, i.e. more chances for you to actually act/fight/do/realize things, instead of just planning, scheming, and convincing others to do them for you. While that'll much more difficult for me as a developer, I realize it'll also be much more fun for everyone who later plays that game.

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